Archive for : July, 2012

How to Preserve Creativity on Social Media

Creativity derives from a world unknown to the creator.

Being creative can be tough. It is often subjective and can be interpreted differently. However, the preservation of creativity even in this growing age of social media can bear much fruit to brands and companies, even individuals. As we face the social giant head on, we must grab it by the horns and evolve around it while maintaining the ability to stay creative. It is not an option, creativity can very well be the antidote to a brand’s stagnation.

HOW CAN YOU PRESERVE CREATIVITY ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

#1: REMAIN STILL: Allow serenity to get the best of you

Having all the possible distractions at our finger tips, we are doomed to never see the lights of peace and quiet. We are streamlined into a world of technology that can build a robot out of you. Make an effort to unglue your eyes from the computer screen, stretch those limbs of yours, grab your keys and head out to a place only you know.

There, find the very space of simplicity and the roots of all creativity. Close your eyes and look around, shut your mind and think freely. Make time to engage socially with yourself before engaging social media. Don’t be afraid of originality, allow your thoughts to recalibrate, click the “refresh” button and livestream your creative ideas.

#2: BUILD A TRIBE: Look for and engage with creative communities

Since we are built to socialize and to have community, do just that! Preserving creativity calls for a team. A team of like-minded people to bounce off. Build a tribe, get connected to a community that has your back and will dodge a bullet for you and at the same time will shoot you with that very same gun.

Social media is fast and brutal, you as a creative individual need to find a creative hub/bank where people share resources, give constructive criticism and intensify ideas.

Explore Creativity on Social Media



    "Being creative on social media demands a wider perspective."









#3: LIVE AN ADVENTURE: Explore the vast world of all things creative

If you haven’t yet taken some pleasure in an adventure, it’s time to put on those boots and rough it out. Creativity is periodically growing; it is a risk taker. Being creative on social media demands a wider perspective. Imagine taking a rocket to have a bird’s eye view of the world; seeing the horizon of the earth and as you go higher, to witness the magnificent curvature of the earth. Explore the vast world of creativity be it online, in libraries, through other creatives or even through the lens of mother nature.

#4: BE CRAZY: Unleash your mind and think BIG, scale it down later on

We often fear the unreachable. We cave our minds, void it of limitless imagination. In order to preserve and add flavor to creativity in this social media generation, it is more than necessary to think big. Being practical is important, but generating ideas while stuck to the ground misses the point of greater heights.

There is a need to let your imagination go wild, there is a time to come back down to earth. However, let’s take off first and land later on, do not miss out on the fresh thoughts that hovers above our minds. Social media creates an avenue for crazy, big and fresh ideas.

As you can conclude that preserving creativity, especially on social media requires extra effort and intentional self-responsibility. Don’t give up creating and innovating! We need you to make an exceptional difference on social media.

Have better and additional methods to preserve creativity on social media? Go on and share your thoughts! All are welcomed.

Post header photo credit: Jonathan Fields

5 Types of Facebook Fans and How to Win Them

Have you ever wondered what are the types of fans that have liked you on Facebook, beyond the given demographics? The thing is this – it is impossible to please every single one of them with a single update and at the same time, bombarding your fans with updates of different nature will drive them away too.

The trick: Talk to them, not at them.

Truth be told, there isn’t a need to engage every single one of your fans all the time simply because not all of them can be reached at one go. Instead of trying to please everyone, try identifying the types of fans you have and understanding the 5 different types of Facebook fans will help you engage them better, at their pace.

#1: The Friend

These are the people you know and maybe you’ve invited them to like your page and they did. Many pages started with this to get a head start in the number of fans (and it is absolutely fine) but that also poses a challenge – to keep them engaged or ‘entertained’. I say it’s a challenge because they may not actually like what you have to offer, but did it as a mere form of support.

What to do?

While they are a challenge, they can work to your advantage as you (should) have a better idea on their preferences. Try breaking them into smaller groups based on their interest (e.g. sports / cooking / gaming) and ask yourself, “What would they like to see?” and try creating content in that area.

They make great sounding boards too! Ask them for opinions to see how are you doing thus far – are your updates too frequent? Are they relevant? Are they eye-catching enough? These are great people to receive honest feedback from. Occasionally, consider getting them to promote your updates / content for you.

#2: The Observer

This group of fans may have liked your page for various reasons – whether its because a friend did the same, something you posted caught their attention or they liked you by accident (it happens). Regardless of how they liked your page, these are fans that prefers consuming content instead of participating.

What to do?

This is a tough one and there’s no one way to do it. Experiment. And keep experimenting. You’ll need to be able to sniff out what content sells and what does not. Are your fans more receptive to photos, quotes, videos, product updates, event updates or polls?

Note: most observers are reluctant to post a comment but they may be good ‘likers’. Use that as an initial indication to determine which content type works and see if you can push it further the next time by initiating a simple call-to-action.

#3: The Customer

It is common for brands to think that this is the most important group of fans – but they aren’t (we’ll come to that soon). These are fans that your brand has come in contact with in one way or another – through a roadshow, a past purchase, a flyer that has created an interest in them or fans that are saying “Let’s see what you’ve got”.

What to do?

Don’t sell. Instead, provide value. Consider providing them social exclusives. Show them how you are improving and how mindful you are to meet their needs and expectations and always look out for opportunities to reward their support. KRAFT Macaroni & Cheese went as far as producing a ‘Likeapella’ to say ‘Thank You’ to 4,800 fans that Liked them on their Facebook page. Now that’s one special way to say thank you!

#4: The Advocate

Nope, these aren’t the most important group of fans either. These fans are awesome to have for every business (who doesn’t want their customers talking about them anyway?) and will actively ‘Like’, ‘Share’, comment and even reply to other fans on your behalf.

What to do?

Don’t smile to yourself and leave them be. Acknowledge their support, contribution and help by simple rewards and recognition. Tools like Crowdbooster are great (and free!) to identify which are the most engaging fans on your page. Mashable went to the extend of putting up a wallpaper of all their Facebook fans in their office.

#5: The Haters

These fans are what brands fear the most. In fact, this is the reason why many brands do not want to have an online presence – the fear of negative comments and bashing from the fans. However, this group of fans is in fact the most important of them all for one reason: a chance to show them (and the other fans) your dedication and sincerity to them.

What to do?

Address them and address them quick. Negative comments spread like wildfire over social platforms and it is up to you to reply them almost as soon as you spot them, but tactfully. Do not, ever, delete or hide their complaints for whatever reasons or to defend yourself. Instead, apologize first and seek whatever clarifications you would require and always offer to compensate.

In most cases, your Advocates will step in to defend against your plight and this is the perfect opportunity to show them that you indeed care and value your fans and to turn haters into lovers.

Everyone is a Potential Customer

By now you should have noticed that regardless of the type of fan they are, every fan is a potential (repeating) customer. Take some time to understand, to experiment and to converse at their own pace and you will be seeing results soon.

What type of fans do you have and how have you been engaging them? I would love to hear your thoughts!